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Park Prescriptions Program Panel at American Public Health Association Conference. Photo courtesy of Donna Leong.

The American Public Health Association Annual Meeting took place in Denver earlier this month and I had the privilege of attending on behalf of the Institute at the Golden Gate. For the Institute’s work at the intersection of parks and public health, it was important for us to understand how parks fit into the priority areas of this large field of public health. Joining 12,000 other colleagues, I saw firsthand the enthusiasm that these public health professionals had for community health promotion.

For community health promotion, APHA looks at the local services that can be accessed for healthier communities; parks, unsurprisingly, were important parts of the social fabric of community engagement. It is always heartening to hear the importance placed on parks from other sectors and the public health professionals at APHA acknowledged the potential that parks had not only to increase public health, but to also create connected communities and mitigate climate change. The emphasis on creating upstream solutions framed the role of parks on creating vibrant communities.

Additionally, I went to show support for the National ParkRx Initiative, which had a panel presentation. As a testament to how parks are received in the public health community, the room was filled and became standing-room only. Drs. Jean Coffey, Nooshin Razani, Robert Zarr, and Daniel Porter discussed their Park Prescriptions programs, which dot the nation, from DC to Vermont, and Texas to California. As equally engaged as the doctors were in their work, it was also exciting to hear the level of enthusiasm that the audience had for the topic. Psychiatric nurses, community liaisons, and students wanted to understand how they could incorporate park and nature-based prescriptions into their own line of work.

As with many conversations around Park Prescriptions, the important question is not just why incorporate the program, but how to incorporate the program? A sentiment that I took away from the conversation was that the first step to incorporating it into any public health field was to try. The entire APHA conference was a crash course in understanding how creativity and a can-do attitude can create a multitude of effective public health solutions. How did communities help to regulate the consumption of tobacco products? They tried programs that would reduce the number of storefront advertisements for them. Now, most counties in the nation are adopting this practice of working with local stores to reduce environmental advertisements of tobacco. How can communities start using parks to create community cohesion, mitigate climate change impacts, and improve human health? The Institute at the Golden Gate is trying out its programs that address these issues and so are our partners. 

Tags: parkrx, health
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