Blog

All Posts (58)

  • Last Thursday, Institute staff and Healthy Parks Healthy People: Bay Area (HPHP: Bay Area) champions made the trek to Microsoft’s offices in Mountain View to attend a “Collaboration for Great Impact” workshop. We joined our friends who have been working on environmental and climate change initiatives to reflect on the Collective Impact model’s role in our own work with HPHP: Bay Area. Pioneered by the social impact consultants, FSG, Collective Impact is a framework to align the work of different organizations into a single goal. Briefly, the five pillars of Collective Impact are: (1) a common agenda, (2) shared measurement, (3) mutually reinforcing activities, (4) continuous communication, and (5) backbone support.

    When the HPHP: Bay Area program started in 2012, the Institute was under no illusions that this would be anything but a seriously complicated endeavor. Not only were we asking for help to create more public programming in the park, but we were asking the collective Bay Area to see nature and parks through the lens of wellness. In working with physicians to prescribe nature and encouraging parks to pave more trails in underserved communities, we have been making small steps towards a change in the broader culture of health, wellness, and parks.

    Thankfully, we at the Institute are not doing this alone. Through the years, the HPHP: Bay Area program has cultivated a group of  organizations and advocates that is engaged in bridging public health and public parks. As we continue to roll out the HPHP: Bay Area programming and bring more healthcare advocates to the fold, this workshop was a time for us to think critically about the future of HPHP: Bay Area through the lens of Collective Impact and its five pillars of success. Often, we are so wrapped up in the day-to-day operations that it is hard to find the time to reflect and learn from our past efforts.

    During the workshop we participated in an exercise that had us imagine what HPHP: Bay Area would look like in 2025 and what would be telltale signs of its success. One partner answered that all awareness campaigns about the significant linkages between nature and wellness are obsolete because communities in 2025 will see that as blatantly obvious. Another partner highlighted the potential lessening of chronic diseases in 2025 as a measurement of success. Working backwards from these visions for the future, our group looked at potential steps we could take in the next month or year to make these goals a possibility. We listed different sectors we wanted to bring into the world of HPHP: Bay Area, as well as plans to create ongoing communication and dialogue within the group. We are still digesting all of the different ideas related to the five pillars that we came up with and will be eager to share them with you soon!

    The year 2025 might be over a decade away, but we at HPHP: Bay Area know that change does not happen all at once. We are amplifying our efforts today in order to make sure that communities in 2025 have the motive, means, and opportunities to visit parks and increase wellness.

     

    Special thanks to our friends at ChangeScale for hosting such a great event!

    Read more…
  • Urban parks create opportunities for community intervention and social interaction, which allows for the transfer of social capital. As social beings, humans require interactions with others and what better place to be amongst friends and soon–to-be friends than an urban park! A question that I have grappled with throughout my research as a health consultant at the Institute at the Golden gate is--how do we create positive interactions within these immensely important spaces? Parks can be both loved and feared places depending on how the space is being used.  

    Through my previous work as a park ranger and environmental educator I have seen first-hand what green space can do for people from all walks of life. Now, at the Institute I am able to dig a little deeper on the important connection between parks and social cohesion. The great landscape architect, Fredrick Law Olmstead, designed both Central Park and Prospect Park with the grand notion of vast open plazas built for social interaction. The ultimate melting ground—parks—offer an opportunity for tremendous information sharing and knowledge. The great opportunity of parks as a place for social cohesion also proposes a potential problem; parks are not always a safe place. As a UC Berkeley masters student studying city planning, I have often looked to Jane Jacobs, a journalist, author and activist known for her fight against urban renewal. Jacobs proposes more eyes on the street—meaning taking ownership of your community.

    One of the most successful community based projects is the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative. Tired of disinvestment, neglect and redlining practices, members of the Roxbury/North Dorchester neighborhood of Boston established the coalition in 1984. The initiative accomplished so many wonderful things including convincing the government of Boston to grant the power of eminent domain over 60 acres of abandoned land called the Dudley Triangle. Another important success story was turning three urban parks in this neighborhood, once used as a primary instrument for drug trade, into positive coalition driven public space.

    The opportunity is the nexus between city planning and health- which the Institute at the Golden Gate strives to answer with both Park Prescriptions and Healthy Parks, Healthy People. The built environment can influence all aspects of a person’s life from education, job opportunities, physical fitness, food offerings, and overall life span. Parks provide a tremendous opportunity for connection amongst a growing diversity of people in urban areas. Much of the existing research has focused on connections between social cohesion and health but many studies have not included how parks can influence social cohesion. The Institute will be digging further into these important links and I look forward to sharing this research and work.  

     

    Read more…
  • Fall Discounts Await at Cavallo Point Lodge

    Cavallo Point Lodge has been consistently named one of the best resorts in the country and we couldn't be prouder to call it a partner. In cooperation with Cavallo Point Lodge, the Institute is able to welcome environmentally-focused organizations and groups to Fort Baker by offering a specially-discounted rate. Between November 1st and April 30th (holiday weekends excluded), eligible organizations can apply for lodging and meeting facilities at heavily discounted rates.

    Come enjoy Cavallo Point Lodge’s 14,000+ square feet of adaptable meeting space, extraordinary meal options such as acclaimed restaurant Murray Circle or laid back Farley Bar, relaxing Healing Arts & Spa, and more in this wonderful National Park setting.

    For a limited time, the Institute can also offer this discounted rate during the month of August 2014!

    To learn how you can hold you next meeting at Fort Baker, check out our Convene page or shoot us an email at convene@instituteatgoldengate.org

    Read more…
  • This month, the Institute fellows shadowed Urban Trailblazer (UTB) youth from the Crissy Field Center (CFC) on a trip to Yosemite. Every summer, the students in this middle school program spend four days and three nights camping, hiking, and exploring in the grand, wild remoteness that Yosemite can offer and bustling Crissy Field can’t.

    From Ruth:
    From the perspective of the Institute’s urban program, this trip is a highly concentrated look at some complicated city-to-park relationships. Style-conscious students wore Converse sneakers and Air Jordans for a steep mountain hike of eight miles, including one who had wadded-up paper stuffed in at his heels. Halfway there, leading the group at a speedy pace, he told leaders that he had never gone hiking before. Another student, awed by the giant sequoias of Mariposa Grove, murmured, “There’s hella trees, yo.” High school staffers—who were program participants themselves not so long ago—shouldered much of the responsibility, modeling outdoor knowhow at an attainable level. They carried extra water for those who might need it, pitched in to cook over the campfire, and led games that left the middle school set giggling and rolling on the ground. The participants clearly admired these young leaders who looked and sounded like they did: “You’re boss,” one said at the end of the week.

    From Hector:
    As part of the Institute’s Health and Wellness Initiative, I decided to join the group not only as an additional source of support but also as an innovative form of evaluation; namely, I would have the opportunity to participate in the hike, splash around underneath the waterfall, and of course, to tell some jokes, all in the name of information gathering. We wanted to gain insight into the CFC methods and learn from the students firsthand what they are learning about their peers, the environment, and themselves. In addition to appreciating the wild on the hike or in the water, we took the opportunity to introduce a healthy menu that was both delicious and nutritious. After dinner when the bellies were full and the faces smiling, I had the chance to conduct one-on-one interviews with a random selection of students to delve deeper into topics such as mental and physical wellbeing as well as food. Conversations with staff following interviews reinforced our belief that our inclusion would provide valuable feedback into changes that could be made immediately but also for future UTB adventurers.

    Read more…
  • Healing by Being Together in Nature

    Magical

    UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland (CHO) Primary Care Clinic has partnered with the East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) to bring families to nature for health. The result has been, in a word, magical. Through the generosity of the Regional Parks Foundation, a Nature Shuttle takes patients, their families, and accompanying clinic staff to a variety of East Bay Regional Parks on the first Saturday of each month. The first two trips have been to Healthy Parks Healthy People programming at Crab Cove Visitor Center at Crown Memorial State Beach on the Alameda Shoreline where we were greeted by a naturalist, participated in guided activities exploring the outdoors, and have enjoyed a meal together.

    Nature prescriptions

    One family was recruited to the Nature Shuttle during a busy clinic morning when a single mother and two toddlers had come in for vaccines and asthma. During the course of the visit, the doctor learned that the family was struggling with housing. Among other more urgent topics, the provider was able to suggest this specific nature activity as a way to relax and recuperate. Once at the tide pools, with her boots covered in mud, this mother said: “This is my last pair of shoes.” She laughed and said that she had to wait until next month to have enough funds to buy a replacement pair, but that it was worth it.

    We are a Federally Qualified Health Center, so a large portion of our patients live below the poverty line. Many lack basic resources such as food, house stability, transportation and child care. Poverty has profound effects on health. Over the course of life, the increased health risks associated with poverty have a cumulative impact of 14 years of difference in life expectancy. It also happens that people with the lowest resources, highest health needs, are often those with the least access to nature.

    We look to nature to help our patients become resilient. We believe nature has the potential to heal because it buffers stress. When people have trees and vegetation around them, they have lower blood pressure, better emotional control, and improved attention and cognition. In larger population studies, green environments reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and increase the sense of well-being and longevity. Children living in more green environments have been shown to have more resilience against stressful life events such as family strife, divorce, and bullying. Associations with improved mental health and access to nature are even more profound for people living in poverty.

    We also look to nature to help families spend quality time with each other. The best conditions to reduce childhood stress are those where young people can feel safe and connected to others and to the world around them; spending time with a loving adults builds resilience in children. Opportunities for quality time increase when families are outdoors. We have observed many distraction-free moments of quiet, tenderness, and laughter between parents, grandparents, and siblings in nature.

    We refer patients to the nature shuttle to increase physical activity, but also to help with stress relief and social isolation.

    I want to stay here forever

    “I want to stay here forever,” said an 11-year-old girl at the end of one of our trips. Her exclamation surprised us as she had been completely silent through out the excursion. For the most part, she helped her parents care for three younger siblings, quietly accompanying them around the tide pools, pond and the Crab Cove Visitor Center. She maintained a vigorous grasp on an adult’s hand as we followed a naturalist out into the muddy tide pools to search for crabs, worms and bat rays. Her sequined pink sneakers were covered in mud, and after a few minutes she turned around and quietly went back to the shore.

     Partnering with children such as this young girl and families to get outdoors has taught us not to make assumptions about how children feel about or experience nature. One young boy jumped into the dirt almost head first, elated, running back and forth to the group to announce his latest discovery such as Mermaid’s Hair Seaweed. One family group spanned three generations, including a teenager wearing headphones. Despite this teen’s cool demeanor, she was just as engaged as her elders when we saw baby ducks. Another boy separated from the group; staying on shore. When we returned from the tide pools we discovered that he had been completely engrossed in finding crabs of different sizes. Filled with pride, he held up his hand which was filled with several little crabs. The toddlers in the group often struggle to sit still, but come to life when allowed simply to run.

    Fun looks different depending on a child’s developmental stage. Young children ages zero to five learn, explore, engage and get active through play. Play is best when spontaneous and self directed. Natural environments that are enriched – that is, with natural elements such as sticks, rocks, and streams – foster healthy development and invite young children to explore while gaining physical skills and coordination. With the little ones, we are often reassuring and encourage parents to find a safe outdoor space and to give their preschooler unstructured time to discover and play. Elementary aged children, on the other hand, enjoy being outside with their parents or friends. To engage an adolescent, it is important to listen to her ideas on where to go and what to do in the outdoors.

    Getting kids to nature is not always easy on the adults 

    The parents on our trips work hard to give their children this opportunity. A half-day excursion into the outdoors takes time, access to nature, and money for supplies, meals, transportation, and childcare. For many people these are formidable challenges. The shuttle leaves from our clinic on the first Saturday of each month. Getting to our clinic poses it’s own challenges: one couple with four children had taken three buses to get there and were running to get to our clinic, as one of their buses was delayed. One grandmother had hailed a taxi when her connecting bus failed to show up. Another mother arrived early so her children could take a nap and catch up on sleep before the trip. Another family of four children had spent two hours on a bus to get to our shuttle. We are humbled by our families’ determination to explore with us.

    But, as is the magic of nature, the barriers between families fall when we are outdoors. Families and staff help each other out. On the bus ride over, several of the mothers traded information on housing options. A naturalist held one mother’s toddler for much of the day so she could tend to another child. The formalities between doctor and patients also drop; one doctor ran and ran with a two year old across a grassy lawn until they both sat down, smiling, and finally tired. The physicians had the opportunity to talk with families in a way that they would never have the opportunity to do otherwise. As social isolation is a true public health issue, the potential for community building in these trips is profound.

    When we say nature, we mean community

    What is it exactly about being outdoors that heals us and heals children? Science tells us the health benefits of nature include physical activity, stress relief, and social contact. Our experience tells us nature is about having fun with friends, family, and community. Being in nature is also about expanding our definition of community. For a child, attaching to the place where they live, and to the plants and animals that share this space with them also has the potential to help them feel connected. Reducing stress and being connected to loving adult and community helps kids become resilient.

    Parks remain an invaluable resource for free and local opportunities to experience nature. Thank you, East Bay Regional Park District for being an amazing collaborator and for caring for our parks. Thank you to UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital for believing in nature. Thank you to parents and caregivers for exploring. Thank you to all the naturalists, environmental educators, and guardians of our nation’s natural resources. You are public health in action.

    We would like to recognize Carol Johnson, Elizabeth Carmody, Sharon Nelson-Embry, Yogi Francis, Pat Chase, Kelley Meade, Christine Schudel, Kelvin Dunn, Curtis Chan, and Kristin Wheeler for helping to create this vision.

    Children's Hospital Oakland Health Educator Christine Schudel, Dr. Razani, Dr. Long, and Dr. Chase gather with families at Crab Cove East Bay Regional Park.

    About the Authors

    Dr. Dayna Long is a staff pediatrician at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland (CHO) where she co-directs the Family Information and Navigation Desk (FIND). She has been a dedicated Nature Champion at CHO and currently collaborates with EBRPD to integrate nature into clinical care in a program called FIND Nature! Dr. Long also serves as Medical Director for the Asthma Clinic where she and her team run an annual camp for children with asthma to spend a week in nature called "Camp Breath Easy."

    Dr. Nooshin Razani is a pediatrician practicing at the Silva Clinic in Hayward and UCSF Benioff CHO. She was trained as a "Nature Champion" by the National Environmental Education Foundation in 2010 and serves as the lead medical Senior Fellow to the Institute at the Golden Gate. She is thrilled at this opportunity to share her love for nature with families through a collaboration with the FIND Nature! team at Children's Hospital Oakland and EBRPD.

    Photos by Nooshin Razani and Elizabeth Carmody

    Read more…
  • Welcome To Our Newly Renovated Offices!

    “Change is the only constant in life.” 

    It’s an old saying that rings true for organizations as well as people.

    Here at the Institute at the Golden Gate, we have been ringing in the changes with new colleagues Ruth Pimentel, Hector Zaragoza and Emilie Wolfson, a new report on effective climate education, and wonderful news from our Healthy Parks, Healthy People program.

    As we continue to expand our impact and our team, we realized it was time to change up our work space, too. Thanks to the phenomenal organizational skills of our Operations and Outreach Manager, Honoré Pedigo, we have reconfigured our offices to accommodate our growing team of almost a dozen people here at Fort Baker. With nice new carpets and a new layout, we're ready to welcome any visitor or VIP! Click here to learn more about our talented team!   

    Read more…
  • Last November, over 140 professionals representing parks and public lands, education, communication, academia, and advocacy came together  to explore ways that we can engage new audiences and move people to take action on climate change at our Parks: The New Climate Classroom conference.

    With a broad range of experience in the room, the conversation touched on a variety of best practices, case studies, and current research around designing education programs that empower, rather than overwhelm, audiences. Following the conference we heard from many of the participants that while the breadth and depth of the content was thought provoking and inspiring, at times it was also challenging to see the direct link between such a broad range of concepts and the on the ground work of educators and communicators.

    To address this challenge and to make the main concepts from the conference available to all, the Institute is pleased to announce the publication of our latest report Insights for Climate Change Communication & Education. This report captures the main themes, lessons, and resources that emerged from Parks: The New Climate Classroom. We hope that this newest report will be a useful tool for our partners and beyond as they continue to innovate and design effective, impactful climate change communication and education programs.

    We would love to hear your thoughts on this report and encourage you to share your experiences in designing and implementing climate change programs. Have you experimented with any of the practices from the conference? Do you have your own strategies that you would recommend? Feel free to share your thoughts below or contact with us via email, Facebook, or Twitter – use #teachclimate to connect!

    Additionally a big thank you goes from the Institute team to all who participated in Parks: The New Climate Classroom. In particular, we want to recognize Julia Townsend, who not only shared her own experiences with those of us at the conference but who also joined our team to author this report.

    Read more…
  • Parks exist to enhance and add value to our lives. From the economic boost they give to cities to the social interactions they help facilitate, we may sometimes take the uncounted benefits of parks for granted. 

    The Healthy Parks Healthy People: Bay Area (HPHP: Bay Area) initiative positions parks as health resources for the whole family—especially those in the highest health need communities. This movement is engaging and creating a whole new group of lifelong park users who will help ensure a future for our parks and public lands for generations to come, while improving their own health at the same time.

    In the last year alone, over 35 park sites throughout the Bay Area have offered Healthy Parks, Healthy People programming on the first Saturday of every month—engaging hundreds of new park users. Parks and health agencies are working together to guarantee that park facilities and programs encourage physical activity, foster social connections, and extend a warm welcome to new visitors.

    Park and healthcare providers hope that this regional initiative can be a catalyst for broad policy change that advances the adoption of measurable recreational models to support the delivery of healthcare to improve the physical and mental health of our population. In the next year we hope to reach an even wider audience and begin to create lifelong park users who will improve the health of our communities and our planet.

    The next time you find yourself overwhelmed by work or stressed out from the daily to-do’s, make the time to go for a walk in your park. We guarantee you'll feel better once you do. The HPHP: Bay Area collaborative is continuing to welcome new and returning park users each month and we hope to see you out there soon. For more information on the collaborative and to find a program near you click here.

    See you in the parks!

    Read more…

  • Urban

    Three Weeks In

    I highly recommend working as a research fellow for the Institute at the Golden Gate. So far, staff members have stumped Hector and me with insider non-profit lingo, given us popsicles, and introduced us to what seems like every person in the Bay Area who thinks about parks and open space for a living. It’s a riot.

    My research area is urban parks. Worldwide, the number of people living in cities is expected to swell rapidly in the next few decades, and that speedy growth will create or intensify a host of social problems—ones that parks can help address. Writing on this site last year, Stephanie Duncan pointed out that parks offer “mental, physical, and social health benefits while at the same time contributing directly to common goods such as air and water quality, biodiversity, and carbon sequestration.” The Institute’s healthfood, and climate projects are already blazing related trails—my task is to narrow in on the special challenges of parks in cities, and find out what unique role they can play.

    The Institute’s template for change always begins with finding successful innovators, so I’ll be collecting smash-hit stories from around the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and its home city of San Francisco, as well as other major urban parks. In particular, I’ll investigate how parks can make themselves relevant to a wider swath of the ethnically and economically diverse communities that gather in big cities. Happily, the Institute already has an inspiring example or two in its network, so I’m excited to document and share their work.

    Here’s to more popsicles, less lingo, and a park for every urban need.

    Read more…
  • Two Weeks In

    As the Fellow for the Health program at the Institute at the Golden Gate, I am excited to contribute to both the Youth Wellness and the Healthy Parks Healthy People: Bay Area initiatives. My main focus will be the collaboration between the Institute and the Crissy Field Center. In essence, we hope to help Crissy Field Center program participants see a holistic connection between personal health and environmental health. As part of a grant from the Gold Foundation, we will work with the Center’s middle-school program, Urban Trail Blazers, to evaluate current activities as well as integrate new ones surrounding the following three categories: Healthy and Sustainable Food, Physical and Active Living, and Mental Wellbeing. I will be joining the students in activities to assess their knowledge, motivations, and barriers towards these topics, in the hopes of encouraging positive and healthy behavior changes.

    Since the Institute is an organization that convenes change makers and shares best practices, I will also draw on lessons learned from the Crissy Field Center collaboration to develop a Youth Wellness Toolkit. Cross-sector educators and community organizations interested in exploring these topics can use this toolkit to implement best practice into their own programs. I will also be providing support to the Healthy Parks Healthy People: Bay Area collaborative. The Institute is currently working with over 40 park, health, and community organizations in all nine Bay Area counties to improve the health and wellbeing of our high health need residents through regular use of parks. The program encourages families and individuals to take outings into local parks so they can enjoy the outdoors while getting in a bit of physical activity. The fresh air and critter sightings also do the mind some good!

    On a personal note, my experience as an environmental educator has given me deeper insight into my natural surroundings and my relationship to it. I connect with that around me in different ways; on some days I am out mountain biking, rock climbing, or swimming in the ocean or playing a bit of football. Whatever the case may be, let’s go on out there!

    Read more…
  • Last Thursday, Institute team members joined over 400 participants in attending the 15th  Annual Open Space Conference put on by the Bay Area Space Council at the Golden Gate Club in the Presidio. This year’s conference theme focused on Welcoming, Interacting, Participating, and looked at how the open space community can expand their reach to include new audiences and open up the conversation about land conservation.

    The day was filled with a variety of speakers, many of which touched on issues that are near and dear to us at the Institute. Elizabeth Babcock from California Academy of Science spoke about exciting new educational collaborations in the Bay Area that are based on the collective impact model. As the Institute has seen the benefits of collective impact first-hand through the Healthy Parks, Healthy People collaborative, we were particularly excited to see it discussed in this venue.

    Rue Mapp, founder of Outdoor Afro, stressed that in order to engage new, diverse audiences in conservation, you must take the time to understand the values and barriers to access and engagement of that specific community. To inspire deep connection, conservation professionals need to go to their target communities and take the time to understand to their needs and values. At the Institute, we have seen the importance of meeting people where they are at and try to integrate this ethos throughout our programs. To hear Rue Mapp speak so eloquently about this issue was truly motivating and inspiring.

    And that is just a couple of the phenomenal speakers that filled the day! For a full list of speakers, visit the Open Space Conference Speakers page.

    Additionally, the organizers built in time for participants to interact with each other as well as the surrounding environment through group sessions and a build your own art with nature station. At lunch Institute Senior Fellow Nooshin Razani mingled with the crowd, giving out park prescriptions and making the important connection between human health and time in nature.

    The Institute team would like to give a huge shout out to the Bay Area Open Space Council for organizing such an inspiring, engaging, and thought provoking conference!

    Read more…
  • San Francisco took a huge stride forward last month by committing to fully adopting Park Prescriptions throughout their public health system. The estimated 30% of San Franciscans who use some form of public health service will be "prescribed" time outside in one of the city’s local, national, or state parks. The program is being implemented by the Department of Public Health in partnership with San Francisco Recreation and Parks and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and represents the first time in the world that an entire city has taken steps to fully implement Park Prescriptions.

    Thanks to the leadership of San Francisco’s park agencies, patients are able to fill their prescription at one of the specially designed Healthy Parks, Healthy People programs. Patients are met by a park staff member and led on an introductory walk to get them familiar with the features of the park while getting physically active and improving their overall wellbeing.

    The first Park Prescription program in San Francisco was piloted at the Southeast Health Center in the Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood. The Kaiser Permanente funded pilot was led by the Institute and championed in clinic by Dr. Nooshin Razani and Dr. Jamal Harris. The lessons learned from this pilot and many others in the Bay Area and across the country will help guide the implementation and long-term plan for the program throughout San Francisco.

    See you in the parks...Doctor's orders!

    Read more…
  • Fellowship for Emerging Leaders

    The Institute at the Golden Gate is pleased to announce we are piloting a Fellowship for Emerging Leaders.

    Inspired by the amazing educational opportunities already available throughout the Golden Gate National Parks though the Crissy Field Center, Park Stewardship, Presidio Trust, and more, the Institute felt we could contribute to this wonderful environmental education pathway. Our hope is that this fellowship will provide a unique professional training experience for those environmentalists just beginning their career. Through the Fellowship, the Institute will connect young leaders with experienced environmental professionals, provide opportunities to develop professional skills, and engage emerging leaders in the Institute’s collaborative, cross-sector program work. 

    The Institute staff and I believe we have found some amazing young professionals to help us kick off this program - we would love to welcome our first class of Fellows: Hector Zaragoza who will be joining out Health & Wellness team, and Ruth Pimentel who will be working with us on our Urban initiative. Photos and bios to come! 

    Read more…
  • Happy Earth Day!

    Throughout the Golden Gate National Parks, there are amazing programs that continue to spark environmental education and connect communities with the great outdoors. One fantastic example is the acclaimed Oceana High School Garden project, a collaboration with Oceana High, Pie Ranch, and the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. Through student leadership and partnership with the parks, this project has blossomed over the past five years into a 22,500 square foot organic vegetable garden, native plant nursery, and outdoor classroom for environmental education. Oceana students engage with park stewardship staff and Pie Ranch educators in a variety of incredible experiential learning in sustainable agriculture including planting, harvesting, cooking, and composting. Additionally, students learn about the nutritional, economic, and environmental benefits of growing organic produce and maintaining native plants in preserving the environment. This project was recently awarded the Golden Bell Award, California’s leading educational honor by the California School Boards Association. 

    This summer the Institute at the Golden Gate is partnering with the nationally recognized Crissy Field Center (CFC) to create more health and wellness activities in our parks and empower the next generation of youth with environmental experiential learning opportunities. The Institute and CFC have designed this year’s Urban Trailblazers program for San Francisco middle school students around the theme of health and wellness in celebration of the program’s tenth anniversary.

    Stay tuned for more news about the Institute’s work in environmental education and youth wellness!

    See you in the parks!

    Read more…
  • Inspiring Spring Reads

    Spring has sprung! And with the change in weather the opportunity to read out of doors is once again upon us. Here at the Institute we are ramping up for summer programs (Have you been to one of our HPHP Bay Area partner events yet?) and planning for fall. Here are a few books from our picnic blankets and nightstands that have been inspiring us lately. 

    Melissa: Creative Confidence by Tom Kelley, David Kelley

    Whitney Mortimer, an Institute Council member, generously gave me a copy of Creative Confidence to learn more about the core of IDEO’s innovation process and human-centered design. Chapter 7 provides a wonderful selection of exercises to help you begin flexing your creative muscles! I’ve utilized several of these helpful tools in meetings with colleagues and in social sector design challenges with my business school classmates at Haas. Each time I practice using the frameworks and tools, I realize how a truly empathetic approach can inspire the most relevant and sustainable solutions. This book has inspired me both professionally and personally, and it serves as a reminder that each of us has the ability to bring creativity to work and to life.

    Kristin: Soundings, The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor by Hali Felt

    The story of a strong willed woman whose maps laid the groundwork for proving the then controversial theory of continental drift. This is a story that captures the romance of scientific discovery and reminds the reader that we still know less about the bottom of the ocean than we do about outer space.

    Catherine: Cooler, Smarter: Practical Steps for Low-Carbon Living by The Union of Concerned Scientists, Seth Shulman, Jeff Deyette, Brenda Ekwurzel, David Friedman, Margaret Mellon, John Rogers, Suzanne Shaw

    Last month, I participated in an interesting workshop put on by NNOCCI at the Aquarium of the Bay on strategies for framing climate change in informal education settings. During the workshop, one of the facilitators mentioned “Cooler, smarter” as the best book she’d come across for individuals looking for ways to combat climate change. Having been on a search for climate solutions the past few months, I had to check it out! The book looks at steps that anyone can take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, from transportation to food choices to policy and advocacy, and helps you figure out how to get the most bang for your buck. While recognizing that individual choices matter, the book also acknowledges the need for community and policy level changes, and helps the reader begin to navigate those worlds as well.

    Honoré: The State of Africa, A History of Fifty Years of Independence by Martin Meredith

    I found this book in a free bin and might have just walked right past – its large size was a bit daunting and while I enjoy non-fiction, I doubted I would get a good sense of a continent from one simple book. I was immediately enthralled with the stories of these great men who saw opportunities for change in Africa – a continent at once overrun by a select group for foreigners and ignored by most of the world- and took steps to do their parts in their home countries. Author Meredith does a wonderful job at providing snapshots of history and the men (and a few women) that helped shape independence, the cold war, and rise of the modern economy or lack thereof. There is a strong focus on themes instead of dates (the narrative in fact jumps in time and from country to country) helping to provide a narrative on the urgency for change. 

    Chris: Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian

    I'm taking a trip down memory lane by re-reading Patrick O'Brian's Master and Commander. This is the first in O'Brian's gripping "Aubrey-Maturin" novels set during the Napoleonic Era. Aside from being a gripping read with a remarkable attention to historical detail, some of the naval themes feel very relevant to the Institute at the Golden Gate -especially the protagonists' willingness to adapt, try out new tactics and ideas, and change tack to achieve the best results.

    We are always in the market for recommendations- what have you been reading? What do you recommend for an inspiring leisure read? 

    Read more…
  • There is growing consensus that nature has many health benefits, from increased physical activity to mental, emotional, and community health benefits. At the Institute we have brought this concept to implementation on a local, regional, and national scale. Recently our local Park Prescriptions pilot in the Bayview Hunters Point community in San Francisco was highlighted in the National Parks Magazine, produced quarterly by the National Parks Conservation Association. The article, A Prescription For Nature, was written by Dr. Daphne Miller - a partner and early advocate of the Healthy Parks, Healthy People movement. 

    The pilot program has made significant strides since its inception in summer 2012. This opportunity, funded by a Community Benefit grant from Kaiser Permanente, allowed us to take lessons learned and existing promising practices from around the country and adapt them to fit the unique needs of the Bayview Hunters Point community. After successfully training the staff of the Southeast Health Center and implementing park prescriptions in the clinic we will be continuing to elevate the important message of spending time outside to improve your health by training community leaders this summer. The community docents will have the knowledge and resources to be ambassadors for the parks and will help bring new audiences to participate in Healthy Parks, Healthy People programs in the Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood.

    Stay tuned for stories and images from this summer's community docent program. Until then, see you in the parks!

    Read more…
  • What is the Future of our National Parks?

    Our National Parks are often called America's best idea. As the U.S. National Park system approaches its 100th anniversary in 2016, the past and future of our parks is a growing subject of discussion. How should parks adapt in this time of rapid economic, social, environmental, demographic and technological change? What challenges are likely? What does the future hold?

    I believe our future lies in making parks relevant and of service to all Americans. Last week, from March 27th-28th, I had the pleasure of attending and speaking at the Wallace Stegner Center's Annual Symposium in Salt Lake City, Utah. The topic this year was "National Parks: Past, Present and Future." The staff at the Center put on a marvelous event, with a great array of speakers. Many of the presenters spoke passionately about the parks. For me, though, the most moving presentations focused on the need for parks to reach out to all Americans in this time of rapid change, to ensure that every single person feels welcomed to this national treasure. High points included Park Service Director Jon Jarvis speaking about stewardship for a new century, author and advocate Audrey Peterman urging a focus on diversity and outreach to new audiences, and Destry Jarvis extolling the virtues of partnerships.

    Promo_19thSymposum

    Here at the Institute at the Golden Gate, we believe in seeking out new and innovative ways to make our National Parks relevant and of value for all Americans, irrespective of race, age, ethnicity or background. Whether it's our health program focused on the role of parks in helping people with high health needs, or our work on parks as a hub of informal education and learning, we believe parks can play a range of different roles in people's lives. In the lead up to our National Park Centennial 2016 and beyond, we will continue to build partnerships and coalitions to support such efforts. 

      

    Read more…
    • Comments: 0
    • Tags:
  • Finding Inspiration from Youth Leaders

    Last Wednesday, the Institute team got an inspiring look at the Project WISE program, a partnership between the Crissy Field Center, the Urban Watershed Project, and Galileo Academy of Science and Technology that gets high school students out of the classroom and, literally, into the field. Throughout the school year, students from two environmental science classes at Galileo spend one afternoon a week conducting field studies around the Presidio and beyond.

    The program culminates in a series of evening presentations, where the youth strut their stuff. They showed us what they’ve learned about the scientific process, how science can impact our communities and inform our behaviors, how people are impacting and impacted by our environment, and what we can all do to become more responsible environmental and community stewards. It was an evening full of inspiring presentations and impressive youth.

    The individual projects ranged from looking at plastics in our beaches and oceans to bacteria in our burgers to smoothies made from a bicycle powered blender. The students picked issues that were near and dear to their hearts and communities, designed compelling experiments, and presented not only the results but also what they tell us about how we can shift our behaviors to better serve the environment and ourselves.

    The Institute team wants to congratulate the youth presenters on this amazing and inspiring evening and to extend a shout out to the partners that made this happen. Because of the hard work of the students, partners, and their amazing success, next year the program will expand to 120 students – doubling the number of participants from this year. We can’t wait to see this program continue to grow and flourish!

    Read more…
  • Continued Education

    Last week, I had the pleasure to attend the two-day Facilitative Leadership course at the Interaction Institute for Social Change. The workshop focused on teaching leaders the tools to focus their creativity, experience, and drive to create the conditions to facilitate their goals while working with others. IISC believes that working together can turn passion into action.

    I felt confident walking into the classroom, with former experience in facilitation and collective impact tucked under my belt. However, it became immediately clear that while I knew the how, I was ignorant of the why, which is just as important. In addition to the many great figurative tools I have added to my toolbox, I learned a new language to use with colleagues and partners.

    The workshop included familiar exercises that many have experienced before, such as building a tower in small groups to develop communication and teamwork. I enjoyed that the information was presented in a variety of methods – lecture, bookwork, activities, and freeform conversation. Not only did these shifts give us different ways to exercise our minds, they also got us physically moving – something that we, working with the parks, love.

    Here at the Institute at the Golden Gate, convening is one of the things we do most- be it facilitating HPHP Bay Area leadership meetings, holding conferences a la last November’s Parks: The New Climate Classroom, or simply asking our friends and colleagues to help us brainstorm the next big program idea. With the skills I practiced last week at the Facilitative Leadership for Social Change workshop, I am better prepared.

    Read more…
  • Climate Change and Our Shifting Sense of Place

    One of my favorite things to do is to sit on my back deck in the morning and watch the vibrant world of birds, insects, trees and flowers. Paying close attention to the patterns of the birds’ flight and behavior, how the seasons are playing out (even in this warm and drought-ridden winter) and the habitual impact of human activity, I am reminded that every day we have the opportunity to observe and appreciate the vast interplay of species and ecosystems around us.

    We are literally living with the challenges of climate change, right here, right now – and it calls on us all to have heightened awareness and keen attention to how the world around us is being impacted. Whether we’re up in the east bay hills, at the Marin headlands, on the coast or in our own backyards we can see change happening.

    We’re incredibly fortunate to be surrounded with awe-inspiring nature and what better way to celebrate it than with a multi-day, free event highlighting the biodiversity and richness of all of our overlapping communities. BioBlitz will give us a chance to connect with our communities, celebrate our parks and public nature spaces, share stories and support each other to take action.

    I’m honored to be part of the event, and to be in conversation with some wonderful people whose work is all about the science of climate change, the art of community engagement and the human scale narratives we can craft to help us protect what matters to us—and to future generations. Come celebrate, connect and be empowered!

    Join us at Impact Hub Oakland on Thursday, March 13 from 6:00-8:00 PM for an evening of thought-provoking discussion examining how climate change and biodiversity loss are impacting our communities and connection to the land, and what we can do about it. This event is presented as part of the Golden Gate National Parks BioBlitz 2014.

    Erica Priggen is the Executive Producer at Free Range Studios, www.freerange.com. 

    Read more…
RSS
Email me when there are new items –